The cultural planning process assesses the current community culture and creates an implementation plan to achieve a community’s vision. Cultural plans act as mirrors for a community—they are, ideally, a reflection of the community’s culture that they serve.

Many communities are engaged in cultural planning to help address the needs and opportunities of the community members by assessing and utilizing the cultural resources available. Some cultural planning may be narrowly focused on the needs of artists, arts organizations, and audiences; however, cultural planners are increasingly considering the role of culture in resolving broader community issues.

The most successful cultural plans address the needs and desires of the community throughout the planning process, from the initial stages to the implementation of cultural programming and development.

Getting Started

Before you start a cultural planning process, you should take time to:

  • Read about cultural planning.
  • Ask questions and listen to others in your community. Are they ready for planning?
  • Build your partnerships and alliances.
  • Learn about the decision-makers in your community.
  • Research funding possibilities.

How long will the planning process take?

  • Preparation (2-3 months)
  • Information Gathering and Research (4-6 months)
  • Assessment and Analysis (2-3 months)
  • Organization and Consultation (ongoing)
  • Writing the Plan (1-2 months)
  • Public Consultation (2-3 months)
  • Finalizing and Adoption (1-2 months)
  • Implementation, Monitoring and Review (Ongoing)

What is a Cultural Facility?

A cultural facility is a building used primarily for the programming, production, presentation, and/or exhibition of cultural disciplines—such as music, dance, theater, literature, visual arts, and historical and science museums. Cultural facilities like concert halls, art galleries, performing arts center, etc. can be an important anchor for a community, often creating a cultural identity for a place.

These facilities can be used as a launching point for a broader cultural plan. Funding for cultural facilities is usually comprised of public support through taxes and private sector resources. In the past two decades, cultural facilities have been seen by artists, arts organizations, government officials, urban planners, and communities as key anchors to the revitalization of distressed communities.

Many arts organizations are using renovated older or abandoned buildings for their businesses and/or performance spaces, particularly in urban areas. Adaptive reuse of older buildings enlivens neighborhoods and gives locals a greater sense of ownership over a facility, while also combating sprawl and increases real estate values in the neighborhood.

Types of Cultural Facilities

Performing Arts Facilities
Performing arts facilities range in size from small to enormous. Most performing arts centers contain multiple varied performance spaces, and often each space is designed for a specific purpose such as symphonic music, theater, dance, etc.

Artist Live/Work Spaces
Spaces where local artists live and work have contributed significantly to the revitalization of communities. Municipal leaders and nonprofit developers are converting older buildings into affordable, long-term housing for low-income artists. Mixed-use facilities are also common, often combining artist housing and work space, exhibition and/or performance areas, and retail areas.

Exhibition/Gallery Spaces
Exhibition and gallery spaces are spaces designed specifically for the display of art and/or historic items. These spaces provide opportunities for local artists to display and sell their work. Often these spaces are also used as small performing venues for local artists.

Museums
Museums range from large institutions to small historic homes. Typically, these facilities host permanent and temporary exhibits for educational or artistic purposes and are open to the public on a regular basis.

Arts Incubators
Incubators create a nurturing environment for small and emerging arts organizations by offering low-cost or subsidized space and services. They provide shared office equipment, telephone, computers, and copy machines. Each incubator is uniquely tailored to meet the needs of the community.

Multiuse Facilities
A multiuse facility is not dedicated to one art form or discipline. Many multiuse facilities have a cluster of arts activities such as dance studios, theaters, galleries, and classrooms. Some facilities also host recreational activities as part of their use.

Different Types of Cultural Plans

  • Comprehensive detailed cultural plan: A community-wide plan based on broadly defined understanding of culture with integrated goals compiled through community consultation.
  • Cultural plan with a single discipline focus: community-wide plan with a specific focus, for example on the arts sector alone or a focus on the visual arts, etc.
  • Community cultural assessment or cultural mapping: a comprehensive identification and analysis of a community’s cultural resources and needs gathered through a broadly based consultative/collaborative process. It is a critical early phase of any cultural planning process.
  • Cultural plan with a project-specific focus: examples include an economic impact study, a feasibility study for fundraising campaign, a feasibility study for a facility, a cultural district study, or a cultural tourism study.
  • Cultural component of municipal or regional general plan: arts and/or heritage and/or culture are integrated vertically as one part of a city or master plan, e.g., a section or chapter of the plan is dedicated to arts, culture, heritage, etc.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Where can I find basic information on cultural planning?

    • The National Endowment for the Arts has a great planning tool site which also includes a “lessons learned” section.
    • Community Cultural Planning: A Guidebook for Community Leaders Although this guidebook (available via download) was developed in 1997, it is still a great guide to community cultural planning. It outlines five steps to developing a cultural plan for your community, as well as profiles of seven communities and their plans and recommendations for effective planning, which will help you ensure optimal benefits for arts and culture in your community. Download a copy for $5.00.
  • Where can I find some examples of cultural planning and cultural mapping?

    • The Creative City Network of Canada has some great examples of cultural planning and mapping. There are free tool kits for cultural planning and cultural mapping.
    • Check out this successful community plans:

  • What are some ways arts facilities have obtained funding from cities?

    • Funding for arts facilities can be obtained through public sources such as bonds, general funds, and Capital Improvement Projects, or private sources including corporate, foundation, and individual gifts. Most organizations depend at least in part by these philanthropic sources. Additionally, centers may hire a consulting firm to manage a capital campaign, or instigate a public or private partnership for management.
    • A few things to consider when looking for funding:

      • Community engagement in fundraising is crucial. Fundraising campaigns force developers to communicate to the public why their center is important and worthy of their support. While large private donations are wonderful, this network of public supporters carriers important ramifications in terms of long-term sustainability: if you don’t make the case for why you are building a center
      • It’s important to initially make the case for the center’s importance and role in the community to establish a public network. Once you’ve raised money for the building, the challenge is not over: maintaining resources to operate the center is an ongoing, yet equally important challenge.
    • While this is not a comprehensive list, here are a few examples of how various arts centers have obtained funding.
    • Find out how Cultural Facilities can impact the local economy.

Topic Page News Tabs

News
Oct 01, 2015

Americans for the Arts invites all Americans to celebrate October as National Arts & Humanities Month (NAHM). Towns and communities across the country are hosting special events that capture the spirit that the arts and humanities bring to everyday life. 

Jul 21, 2015

Americans for the Arts and Cultural Data Project (CDP) announced Monday a new collaboration between the two organizations as we begin our fifth national economic impact study of the nation’s nonprofit arts and culture industry, Arts & Economic Prosperity 5.

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Jun 22, 2016

In Greenville, Calif.—population 1,200—the local junior/senior high school has not been able to purchase new books since the 1990s. But all that is changing, thanks to an online campaign that's gone viral.

Jun 08, 2016

At a time when the number of pedestrian traffic deaths is increasing as urban residents are encouraged to walk and bike more, the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) is committing to creativity and innovation by hiring a sound artist to help fix the issue.

Dec 03, 2015

There is nothing like art to bring people together and heal, even in the face of human tragedy on a massive scale.

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