Public art is often site-specific, meaning it is created in response to the place and community in which it resides. It often interprets the history of the place, its people, and perhaps addresses a social or environmental issue. The work may be created in collaboration with the community, reflecting the ideas and values of those for whom it’s created.

Being public, the art is free and accessible to everyone. Public art creates a heightened awareness in the viewer of the site of the people and the broader context of what’s around them. Today, viewers may capture a photo of the public art on their smartphone and share the work and the experience with others, extending the reach of public art beyond the site.

Whatever the form, public art instills meaning—a greater sense of identity and understandings of where we live, work, and visit—creating memorable experiences for all.

For more information on creating, finding, and supporting public art, please refer to Public Art Tools and Resources.

Photos: Synchronicity of Color by Margo Sawyer
Location: Discovery Green, Houston Texas
Project of Houston Arts Alliance Civic Art + Design, 2009

How is public art developed and created?

Public art is typically developed and managed by a municipal agency such as a local arts agency or private entity such as a nonprofit art organization. Public art may also be artist-driven, self-funded, and created outside of an institutional framework. Public art projects, especially when publically funded, are typically part of development or construction projects that are part of a larger urban development or cultural plan.

Public agencies that may implement public art include City Planning, Parks and Recreation, and Economic Development departments. The commissioning entity distributes a request for proposals or a request for qualifications for a designated project and selects an artist or team of artists to implement the proposed work. Frequently, the selected artist(s) works with a design team of interdisciplinary professionals including public art administrators, planners, architects, landscape architects, and engineers. The most successful public art projects involve both the artist and the community at the onset of the project.

How can I find public art in my community and other places I visit?

Public art can easily be found by searching online. Many public art programs have created smartphone apps or online digital maps and databases of their collection. Many collections can be searched by city and state on websites including Public Art Archive and CultureNow. Public art programs and local arts agencies can be found in our Arts Services Directory.

How can I get public art approved for my community? Where do I start?

The design for a proposed public artwork is typically approved by city’s art commission or art council. Appointed members to an arts commission typically include: artists, visual art and public art professionals, designers, landscape architects, and planners. Following the art commission approval of the proposed public art design, the permit to build the public art work typically goes through a city’s building and zoning/permitting department. If the public artwork is temporary, the project is often categorized as an event and goes through a city’s event permitting department.

How is public art funded?

Public art is typically funded through the government, but increasingly through public-private partnerships as well. Percent for Art is an ordinance or policy specifying that a percentage of a city’s capital improvement project funds (CIP) are set aside for the commission, purchase, fabrication, and installation of public artwork. Percent for Art ordinances typically designate around 1 percent of the total construction or renovation budget. Percent for Art projects are typically incorporated on a city-owned site such as civic center, library, plaza, or park.

Private developers are increasingly incorporating and funding public art in private development projects. These public art projects may be funded through grants or loans to a program. Americans for the Arts does not fund public art.

How are artists identified and selected to create a public artwork?

Public art programs commissioning public art projects either directly contact an artist(s) or use an open or limited competition process. The most common is an open competition Call for Artists giving artists the information they need to apply to be considered for a project. Call for artists can be one of two types: Request for Qualifications (RFQ) or Request for Proposals (RFP). For more on public art funding, check out our Public Art Network FAQs.

 

Year in Review
The Public Art Network’s Year in Review is the only national
program that specifically
recognizes public art projects.
Artist / Sarah West, Artist / Christopher Field
Artist / Crystal Schenk, Artist / Shelby Davis
Artist / Laura Haddad
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Topic Page News Tabs

News
Sep 12, 2016

KRIS Wines is partnering with Americans for the Arts on a new campaign recognizing the importance of public art in American communities, and will award a total of $25,000 in prizes to artists through the #KRISArtofGiving campaign.

Jul 06, 2016

Best Practices for Public Art Projects includes the statements, a letter from Americans for the Arts President & CEO Robert L. Lynch, and presentation materials to assist public art professionals in introducing these practices to their communities.

Jun 17, 2016

Americans for the Arts honored 38 outstanding public art projects created in 2015 at its Annual Convention in Boston through the Public Art Network Year in Review program. 

News
Sep 01, 2016

Murals, sculptures and even sound scores adorn our cities, exposing and exploring our histories and cultures.

Jul 26, 2016

Jackson Hole Public Art announced today the release of POP—Places of Possibility: A Public Art & Placemaking Toolkit for Rural Communities, a 37-page guide to creating a successful public art program in a small town.

Jun 15, 2016

On May 27, the Smithsonian National Zoo, in partnership with the community-based environmental advocacy non-profit The

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This is the official blog of Americans for the Arts, so I might be preaching to the choir when I point out the value that public art projects bring to communities. Public art adds value by providing a visual interest to the area, activates public places, and helps builds community vitality, to...

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For the 16th anniversary of the Public Art Network Year in Review, we offered the selected applicants and artists the opportunity to tell us the stories...

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Support Public Art
Does your town have a vibrant public art scene? How can you help bring public art to your community?
Traveling Man Waiting on a Train
Brad Oldham

Start a percent for art program in your community? Every new building project will be required to allocate a percent of its building budget to public art display.

Contact your Mayor or Governor and ask for more public art.  

We have resources to help you advocate with your elected officials.  Make a donation.  Your dollars help us get more visbility for public art projects.