SEARCH RESULTS FOR ARTS AND MILITARY IN AMERICANS FOR THE ARTS ARCHIVE : 37 ITEMS FOUND

Author(s): Americans for the Arts
Date of Publication: 2016

A Briefing Paper prepared for the National Roundtable for Arts, Health and Well-being Across the Military Continuum, November 30, 2016.

Author(s): Rollins, Judy, Ph.D, RN
Date of Publication: November 2012

This report, The Arts: A Promising Solution to Meeting the Challenges of Today’s Military—A Summary Report and Blueprint for Action (PDF, 1.27 MB) is intended to open the door for a national conversation and the development of a National Action Plan that will ensure the availability of arts interventions for our service men and women and their families, and integrate the arts as part of the “Standard of Care” in military clinical (VA and military hospitals) as well as programs in community settings across the country.

Author(s): National Assembly of State Arts Agencies
Date of Publication: 2016

NASAA's Arts & Military Snap Survey was a first step toward gaining a more comprehensive understanding of state arts agency (SAA) and regional arts organization (RAO) policies, programs, services, partnerships and other efforts to serve military and veteran populations.

Author(s): Americans for the Arts
Date of Publication: 2013

Published in October, 2013 the report, Arts, Health, and Well-Being Across the Military Continuum - White Paper and Framing a National Plan for Action, details a series of recommendations in the areas of research, practice, and policy that came out of two national convenings. The convening were The Arts and Health in the Military National Roundtable (November 2012) and the National Summit: Arts, Health, and Well-Being Across the Military Continuum.

Author(s): Americans for the Arts
Date of Publication: 2013

The 2013 topic for the National Arts Policy Roundtable, Arts and Healing: Mind, Body and Community proposed that the arts can play an important role in the rehabilitation of those who have experienced both mental and physical traumas, including our nation's wounded servicemen and women.

Author(s): Americans for the Arts
Date of Publication: Dec 31, 2013

This document provides evidence that supports successful creative arts therapies and arts in healthcare programs in hopes of encouraging growth of these program to improve our country's health and wellness.

Author(s): Judy Rollins, PhD, RN
Date of Publication: 2012

Power point presentation from the webinar presented by the Arts and Health Alliance (formerly the Global Alliance for Arts & Health) entitled, Reuniting through the Arts: Offering Creative Arts Experiences That Support Families of Returning Wounded Troops, led by Judy Rollins, PhD, RN, Rollins & Associates, and Ermyn King, MA, ArtStream, Inc. in 2012.

Author(s): Judy Rollins, PhD, RN and Ermyn King, MA
Date of Publication: 2011

Power point presentation from the webinar presented by the Arts and Health Alliance (formerly the Global Alliance for Arts & Health) entitled, Coming Home to the Arts: Bringing Creative Arts Opportunities to Wounded Warriors, Their Families, and Military Hospital Staff led by Judy Rollins, PhD, RN and Ermyn King, MA in 2011.

Author(s): Ketch, Robert A.; Rubin, Robert T.; Baker, Matthew R.; Sones, Alexander C.; and Ames, Donna
Date of Publication: July 2015

"Preliminary evidence from self-report measures indicates positive effects on mood, self-esteem, socialization and community participation among the veteran participants and recognition among staff that the course aids the veterans’ recovery process. Appreciating art thus appears to promote both subjective and objective improvement in recovery and community re-integration for veterans who are experiencing chronic and disabling emotional distress."

Author(s): Mims, Rachel
Date of Publication: 2015

"This paper details a pilot study that used a six-week visual journaling art therapy group with military veterans in recovery in order to reduce symptoms of stress, anxiety, depression, and trauma. Two participants completed the journaling group, pre- and posttest Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation—Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), and an individual interview. The data from the CORE-OM were analyzed to determine change in overall score as well as the domains of life functioning, risk/harm, problems/symptoms, and subjective well-being. The individual interviews were analyzed to

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