Americans for the Arts Introduces the Arts + Social Impact Explorer

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Today, Americans for the Arts unveiled the Arts + Social Impact Explorer, an interactive online tool that draws together more than 1,000 data points on how the arts impact and integrate into 26 different sectors ranging from education and innovation, to health and wellness, immigration, faith and environment. The tool provides quick top-line research, example projects, core research papers, and lists service and partner organizations doing this work, as well as provides printable PDF fact sheets to share with decisionmakers.

Americans Speak Out About the Arts in 2018: An In-Depth Look at Perceptions and Attitudes About the Arts in America

In a society struggling to find equity and social justice, Americans believe the arts improve the quality of our communities. How do we know? We asked. Americans Speak Out About the Arts in 2018 is the second in a series of national public opinion surveys conducted by Ipsos on behalf of Americans for the Arts. One of the largest ever conducted, it gauges the public perspective on (1) personal engagement in the arts as audience and creator, (2) support for arts education and government arts funding, (3) opinions on the personal and well-being benefits that come from engaging in the arts, and (4) how those personal benefits extend to the community. Here are some findings of the survey. 

Hosted by Fading Echoes on Saturday the13th, October 2018 1pm-7pm
Celebrate the Arts Event: 1-3pm artist demonstrations including clay, painting and drawing. Live music throughout the event. 3pm reception and conversations with artists start- visual artists/ entrepreneurs Carrie Olaje, Icela Pereida and Jason Scott will discuss their experiences and techniques. Conversation moderated by Tonya Borgeson owner of Fading Echoes. 
Bisbee Arts Commission sponsored this activity- through an Artist Grant Application submitted by Tonya Borgeson

JAZZmeetsPOETRY returns for Season 2 at The Nash. Part theatre, part concert, poets and jazz musicians take center stage to make art that is expressive, interactive and captivating. 
The opening show of the season celebrates National Black Poetry Day (October 17) and The Black Poets anthology edited by the legendary Dudley Randall (1914-2000), director of Broadside Press and a visiting professor of African-American poetry at the University of Michigan. Originally published in 1971, The Black Poets anthology was re-released April 1985. 

Americans for the Arts Is Celebrating National Arts in Education Week September 9-15

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

National Arts in Education Week Logo
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Americans for the Arts today announced its celebration of National Arts in Education Week. During this week, the field of arts education joins together in communities across the nation to celebrate the transformative power of the arts in education. 

To celebrate Arts in Education Week 2018, the Conservatory of Arts and Design at Desert Edge High School will create a variety of Fine Arts experiences on the campus at Desert Edge throughout the week of September 9-15.   All Fine Arts disciplines will participate.
Art Activities during the week include:

  • Dance- Schoolwide choreographed dance
  • Choir-Music in the lobby
  • Theater-Arts Cafe
  • Band- Flash mob marching
  • Visual Art- Mobile Mural in the courtyard

Arizona Arts Community Overturns State Arts Funding Cuts

Monday, May 14, 2018

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Arizona Citizens for the Arts rallied its advocates over Governor Doug Ducey's plan to eliminate $2 million in funding for arts grants, and the state legislature and governor heard from over 1,000 constituents speaking out against zeroing out state arts funding.

Preparing Your Organization and Your Donors for Shifts in the Charitable Tax Deduction

On January 1, the 2018 Tax Cuts & Jobs Act went into effect, a substantial change to the U.S. tax code which has the potential to negatively impact arts and culture nonprofit organizations in a variety of ways. One of the most significant impacts will come in changes related to the thresholds and amounts associated with the charitable tax deduction. This 100-year-old provision was designed to stimulate giving to charities and other organizations serving the public good by providing an opportunity to claim a deduction as a reduction in an individual’s tax burden. While the repercussions of the federal tax code changes are still emerging, and corresponding shifts in state-by-state tax policy may impact your situation, the notes that follow are an introductory primer. If you have questions about state-level implications, we recommend you reach out to your state comptroller or state association of nonprofits.

Arts Advocacy Day Is Coming

Although years may really just be a number, in its 31 years, Arts Advocacy Day has seen six different U.S. presidents spanning both political parties. It’s witnessed sixteen different congressional sessions and eight different Speakers of the U.S. House. Through it all, every year, attendees hear that “the arts are bipARTtisan.” Because, no matter who’s in office, arts advocacy matters. Funding decisions are made every year. Who’s deciding this year may not be deciding next year. Who’s to remember what happened before? Who’s to know why it matters? Who’s to learn from each other? The answer is us. All of us. All of us together.

Tucson’s culinary prestige and heritage food movement has been growing each year, and now is the time to SAVOR. Indulge in the flavors of Southern Arizona’s culinary arts at the 5th Annual SAVOR Southern Arizona Food & Wine Festival surrounded by the colorful floral blooms of the Tucson Botanical Gardens. 

Featuring over 75 of the region’s finest chefs, wineries, breweries, local foods and restaurants highlighting exceptional menu tastings.  This foodie festival will showcase the diversity of the heritage foods and ingredients throughout the Southwest region.

Why?

Prototyping: Again, with feeling!

An iterative process is often useful, especially in the context of interactive public art: the collective public has a genius ability to subvert or repurpose objects and installations from their intended purpose. It can therefore be very helpful to periodically get something into the hands of someone who hasn’t been immersed in the project since its conception to see what they will do with it. Workshops with the communities that will ultimately be served by a project can serve as valuable de facto prototyping sessions as well.

Got Water?

“My Your Our Water” evolved from a residency with Salt River Project and Scottsdale Public Art that was primarily focused on the far-reaching functions of SRP and a seemingly invisible desert water delivery system, to a conversation about water issues on an individual, communal, and global spectrum. “My Your Our Water” is forever growing and shifting with each encounter. It shapes how I perceive water, how I perceive myself in relationship to water, and in turn, I like to believe it causes shifts in perception and action in those that engage with it.

Public Art Blooms in the Arizona Canal

As an artist whose work addresses both the natural elements of a site as well as its history, Bruce Munro was intrigued by the history of the Arizona Canal and indeed the entire canal system. Respectful of and intrigued by the history of the prehistoric, indigenous people who farmed using a canal system that brought water to the desert landscape, Munro brought to life floating pontoons of fishing rods that sparkled by day in the Arizona sunshine and lit up at night like chandeliers floating atop the canal waters. The result, Blooms, was a stunning acknowledgment of the natural environment.

The Spirits Sitting on My Shoulder

Maybe these are familiar to you: you have a great idea but you cannot get it off the ground because funders cannot see its worth; or, worse yet, you cannot get the community you want to come see it to actually come. Those are real problems. So, that’s when the Aesthetic Perspectives: Attributes of Excellence in Arts for Change could beautifully help guide our creations, and to truly engage community. 

New Resources Summarize IMLS Support for Museums and Libraries in Each State

Thursday, June 29, 2017

The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) released reports with detailed views of IMLS funding for the past six years (FY 2011 through FY 2016) for every state across the nation and the District of Columbia, including total dollars and counts of IMLS grants and awards, as well as amounts of grantee matches or state government maintenance of effort levels.

Cuts to the Arts will Make our Communities Less Vibrant

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

This op-ed was contributed to The Arizona Republic by James K. Ballinger is director emeritus at Phoenix Art Museum; Brenda Thomson is executive director of Arizona Humanities; and Thomas H. Wilson is president of Arizona Citizens for the Arts.

Arts & Economic Prosperity 5: How the Nonprofit Arts & Culture Industry Impacts the Economy in Your Community

When recently asked how best to advocate for the arts in the current environment, U.S. Senator Tom Udall (NM)—co-chair of the Senate Cultural Caucus and chief sponsor of the CREATE Act—was unequivocal: “Start by telling every one of your Senators about the economic benefits of the arts.” This familiar refrain is one we have heard for decades from city council chambers to governor mansions to the halls of Congress—and it works. Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 does just that. It changes the conversation about the arts from that of a “charity” to one about an “industry” that provides both cultural and economic benefits to the community.

Americans for the Arts Unveils Findings from Fifth National Economic Impact Study of Nonprofit Arts and Cultural Organizations and Their Audiences

Study Demonstrates That Nonprofit Arts Are An Economic, Employment Powerhouse

Saturday, June 17, 2017

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A new national study by Americans for the Arts finds that the nation’s nonprofit arts and culture industry generated $166.3 billion in economic activity in 2015—$63.8 billion in spending by arts and cultural organizations and an additional $102.5 billion in event-related spending by their audiences. This activity supported 4.6 million jobs and generated $27.5 billion in government revenue. 

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