Americans Speak out About the Arts in 2018

Americans for the Arts Previews National Survey on Arts Attitudes, Perceptions in America

Friday, June 15, 2018

Today at the Americans for the Arts Annual Convention in Denver, Colorado, Americans for the Arts President and CEO Robert L. Lynch announced the completion of a new in-depth study of American perceptions and attitudes towards the arts and arts funding, to be released July 24, 2018, and revealed three highlights of the study during his State of the Arts speech.

Schools Must Be Safe Places for Students to Learn and Pursue Their Passions

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

A nation plagued by school shootings watched the horror play out yet again in Southeast Texas when eight Santa Fe High School students and two teachers were killed and 10 others were wounded recently in the worst school shooting since the February assault on Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Many of these victims were in an arts classroom making art at the time. Schools must be safe places for students to learn and pursue their passions in the arts and beyond. 

Americans for the Arts Thanks NEA Chairwoman Jane Chu for Four Years of Tireless Arts Leadership

Monday, April 30, 2018

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Americans for the Arts President and CEO Robert L. Lynch offered a statement in reaction to news that National Endowment for the Arts Chairwoman Jane Chu has chosen to resign on June 4, 2018.  

The Battle Wages On for the Arts

Our field collectively high-fived recently when Congress passed the long-delayed budget for fiscal year 2018. Together we beat back the Trump Administration’s proposals to terminate the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, funded now through September 30. Each will receive a total of $152.8 million, $3 million more a piece than last year. Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, who passed away last month, was a fierce champion for the arts for decades, and this win is a very fitting tribute to her longtime leadership. It took the unified, tireless, and persistent work of the arts community and grassroots advocates nationwide to achieve this win. Strong activism resulted in a powerful bipartisan message that arts and humanities funding strengthens and enriches our communities and grows local economies. 

Remembering Louise (1929 – 2018)

On March 16, 2018, a dear friend, tireless advocate, and arts leader passed away, U.S. Representative Louise M. Slaughter. I have known Louise for 32 years. We’ve partnered in nearly that many Arts Advocacy Days. It has always been my honor to stand with Louise. I’ve stood with her on over 100 occasions in the last 23 years while she co-chaired the Congressional Arts Caucus. Americans for the Arts and the nation’s arts community owe a debt of gratitude to Louise Slaughter. There has never been an arts advocate with more tenacity, fight, humor, and spirit of generosity. May she rest in peace knowing that she made the world a better place through the arts, and may her trailblazing pave the way to more arts leaders recognizing the transformational power of the arts on our lives, communities, economy, and nation.

Americans for the Arts Reacts to $152.8 Million Funding Increase to Each NEA, NEH

Thursday, March 22, 2018

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Americans for the Arts President and CEO Robert L. Lynch offered a statement in reaction to last night’s proposal by Congress to fund the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) at $152.8 million each. 

Eight for 2018: New Obstacles and Opportunities in the Arts

Over the first quarter of 2018 I’ve had the great opportunity to spend time listening to the wisdom of my colleagues in the field. From these gatherings, I continue to see first-hand the spectacular array of work and service offered by the non-profit arts community in our country. It is a vibrant, effective, optimistic, inciteful, and growing field that uplifts our communities across the country. Despite challenges in funding and support, the creativity of our arts field surges forward. There are new benchmarks to celebrate and new obstacles to overcome, all leading I hope to new opportunities for the arts. Here are eight observations for 2018.

We Should All Value the Artists and Their Vital Role in Our Communities

As we celebrate the holidays, I encourage you to think of all the ways artists have helped your company, organization, place of worship, community. How have artists bettered your family and your life? Think about the artist behind the public art mural as you pass by while running errands. Take a moment to listen to caroling. Take family and friends to galleries, a live music venue, or small theater production. Let’s all support these artists and community change-makers this holiday season. 

Looking Back and Moving Forward—Supporting Our Veterans Through the Arts

November is Veterans Month, a time to celebrate, honor, and reflect on the contributions of the men and women who have served our country in peacetime and in conflict. Earlier this month, I made my way to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center for their 14th Annual Healing Arts Exhibit and Symposium, where I was met by the champion of this effort, Captain Moira G. McGuire, and had an opportunity to explore the art on display. My job there was to give the opening speech about the long history of connection between the arts and the military going all the way back to the days of Benjamin Franklin and George Washington, but being surrounded by the incredible artwork produced by the wounded, ill, and injured members of the armed services and their families was the real benefit of being there.

Americans for the Arts Issues Statement in Response to Proposed Funding of $150 Million to NEA, NEH

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

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Americans for the Arts President and CEO Robert L. Lynch offered a statement in response to the November 20, 2017 action on the FY 2018 Senate Interior Appropriations bill, which includes proposed funding of $150 million each for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities.
 

Artists’ Voices Ring Through Civic Dialogue and Municipal Engagement

The role of the artist is changing. In the midst of these challenging times, civic engagement has become the focus of attention across many sectors and fields. More than ever, the arts are promoting greater awareness and understanding of community issues, contributing to shifts in thinking and in attitude. I see artists and arts organizations across the country being integrated into practices of civic engagement, and applying the power of artistic imagination to inform, inspire, engage, and motivate social action. And I continue to applaud state and municipal governments across the U.S. for embracing such collaborations.

Arts Education Transforms Teaching, Learning, and the Lives of Our Young People

During this week of celebration, advocates in every state are working to secure equity in access to arts education and articulate the role of the arts as a pathway to academic success, specifically in the education of students of color, students in rural communities, students who are classified as low-socioeconomic status English Language Learners, or those who require special education. Former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has stated, “This is absolutely an equity issue and a civil rights issue.” We recognize this issue. We stand against the barriers that cause this issue. And we are working to overcome this issue.

Message on the Impact of Public Art on the History and Pride of Diverse Communities

Friday, August 18, 2017

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As communities are grappling with the existence and legacy of divisive monuments, Americans for the Arts president and CEO Robert L. Lynch issued the following statement about the impact of public art, including monuments to the Confederacy, on the history and pride of diverse communities.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi shares some thoughts about the role of the arts in politics (and vice versa) and is joined by Americans for the Arts President and CEO Robert Lynch for a wide-ranging conversation and Q&A.

Bob Lynch, President and CEO of Americans for the Arts, gives opening remarks at the Congressional Arts Kickoff on Tuesday, March 21, 2017.

Americans for the Arts presents the 1st Annual David Rockefeller Lecture on Arts and Business delivered by Co-Founder and Co-CEO of The Carlyle Group, David M. Rubenstein.

The 30th Annual Nancy Hanks Lecture on Arts and Public Policy delivered by Ford Foundation President Darren Walker, with opening remarks by Americans for the Arts President and CEO Robert L. Lynch.

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